Book review: Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Administration with Windows PowerShell

Almost every training I teach I get the question: “What with PowerShell?”. Students want to know what they can do with PowerShell, how it’s used and most important where they can learn it. I learned the PowerShell (very) basics from articles on the internet, demo’s on events and so on. But now I think a found a winner for DBA’s who want to start learning PowerShell. The Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Administration with Windows PowerShell book by Ananthakumar Muthusamy (blog) and Yan Pan (blog) is a perfect guide for DBA’s who start with PowerShell or who already know PowerShell but want to use it to administer their MS SQL Servers. Also beginning DBA’s can start using the book because it’s full of tips, tricks and explanations on how and why certain tasks are done.

The first 4 chapters bring the PowerShell ‘dummy’ up to speed with the very basics of PowerShell. Readers will learn how to use commands, create scripts and work with Functions, Parameters and so on. Extensive code examples help to master the basics fast.

In chapter 5 to 8 the writers dig in deeper on the use of PowerShell and how to get information and to get things done on Windows level, covering the File System, Registry, Event Logs, Services and the WMI Provider

And finally starting from chapter 9 to 13 the reader starts reading what a DBA can do with Windows PowerShell starting with the provider for Configuration Management over the SQL Server PowerShell provider, policies and the SMO.

After these chapters the book could have stopped. Everything about PowerShell and SQL Server is covered to get a DBA started but the real surplus of the book is about to start. First chapter 14 is there to advise on using and creating standards within SQL Server and PowerShell. Nothing new, nothing spectacular but it’s nice to see the writers care about standards and want to help and guide beginning coders to use them.

Starting from chapter 15 to 21 all the knowledge of the previous chapters is put into practise. The chapters are no easy read but show the readers how to create a complete PowerShell solution to inventory, monitor and manage a complete SQL Server environment. And even if the reader doesn’t want to create such a solution. The coding examples are just great to lookup how a certain task can be accomplished with PowerShell.

Conclusion

Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Administration with Windows Powershell is not a book to read on a holiday nor in bed. But I think it’s a must have on every DBA’s bookshelf whether the DBA is a starter or a senior. Everybody will find value in this book.

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